Parasitic Diseases Gouldian finch

Acariosis

ORIGIN: Grupo de parásitos externos.

  • Sternostoma tracheacolum (ácaros de los sacos aéreos)
  • Syringophilus bipeptioratus (ácaros de las plumas)
  • Dermanysus spp. y Ornithonyssus spp. (ácaros hematófagos)

 

EPIDEMIOLOGY:

- They are nocturnal microorganisms, using cracks and holes to hide during the day. Porous materials used in the construction of the aviaries are a perfect niche to protect against inclement environment around them.

- Factors that favor its appearance:

  • Absence of hygiene and cleanliness.
  • Absence of baths for animals.
  • Poor ventilation facilities.
  • Porous material.
  • Excess animals in cages and aviaries.
  • Absence of quarantines on new acquisitions.

 

TRANSMISSION:

  • Respiratory: Through expectoration of sick birds.
  • Directly: By contact between parasitized animals.

 

CLINIC:

  • Scabies Skin: Intense itching. They will scratch much with its beak or against objects inside the cage. Sometimes, loss of feathers on the head and neck. If it affects the legs: whitish scabs, irritation and pain that impedes mobility.
  • Scabies feathers: feathers loss, usually in the back although in severe cases, can lose all their feathers.
  • Bloodsucking mites: Anemia.
  • Air sac mites: Coughing, sneezing, dyspnea, open beak and a characteristic wheeziness.

 

DIAGNOSIS:

By direct observation of the parasite with a microscope or a magnifying glass. The samples to be sent to the laboratory will be scrapings skin and feathers Slitting affected

TREATMENT:

  • Ivermectin topical 1%, 10% diluted in propylene glycol for direct administration on the neck of the animal.
  • Vitamin A.
  • Disinfestation facilities.

 


 

Coccidiosis (Isospora & Elmeria)

ORIGIN: Isospora serini, Isospora canari, Elmeria spp.

EPIDEMIOLOGY:

- Factors that favor its appearance:

  • Stressful situations.
  • Overcrowding in cages and voladeras.
  • Absence of hygiene and cleanliness.
  • Ventilation and humidity problems at the facility.
  • Poor feeding.
  • Deficiencies of vitamins.
  • Presence of asymptomatic carrier animals.
  • Absence quarantine new acquisitions.

 

TRANSMISSION:

  • Oral: Ingestion of material contaminated with feces.

 

CLINIC:

  • Lack of appetite.
  • Diarrhea (black or dark brown)
  • Ruffling feathers
  • Drowsiness
  • Apathy.

The animals most affected are young people from the 2nd or 3rd week of life and immunosuppressed adults.
Times more incidence are breeding and molting.

 

DIAGNOSIS:

Identification and counting of eggs in the laboratory from stool samples

TREATMENT:

  • Baycox 2.5% (5 days / rest / 5 days) 2-3 ml / l water.
  • Sulfonamides (5 days / rest / 5 days) never completely eradicate the parasite.
  • Vitamin K.
  • Probiotics.

 


 

Trichomoniasis (Trichomona spp)

ORIGIN: Trichomona columbae, trichomona gallinae.

EPIDEMIOLOGY:

- Factors that favor its appearance:

  • Stressful situations
  • Poor feeding
  • Deficiencies of vitamins
  • Lack of hygiene
  • Overcrowding in cages or voladeras
  • Absence quarantine..
  • Presence in the aviary of pigeons.

 

TRANSMISSION:

  • Oral: Ingestion of contaminated material and water.
  • directly: By contact with affected animals and through bloat.

 

CLINIC:

  • Oral: Small scabs on the mouth and pharynx. The animal seems to be constantly chewing.
  • Systematically: Apathy, drowsiness, ruffling their feathers and green diarrhea, Sinusitis, inflammation of the tissues around the eyes, bad breath in sick animals.

 

DIAGNOSIS:

By direct observation of the parasite microscopically on samples taken in the oral cavity and craw swabs.

TREATMENT:

  • Metronidazole (Flagyl) (7 days - 100 to 200 mg / lt water for all animals.).
  • Ronidazole (Trichocure) (5 days - 400 mg / l water.).
  • Carnidazol (Spartrix) (2 days -.. 20 mg / kg or 1/4 tablet per bird also put all birds 6 hours without drinking and prepare 5 tablets in 40 ml.).
  • Vitamin A.

 


 

Cochlosoma (Cochlosoma spp)

ORIGIN: Cochlosoma spp

EPIDEMIOLOGY:

- Very important in breeding Gouldian finch and Society finch. He lives in the gastrointestinal tract.

- Factors that favor its appearance:

  • High humidity in the environment
  • Absence of hygiene and cleanliness
  • Poor feeding
  • Deficiencies of vitamins and minerals
  • Stressful situations
  • Presence of alien species in aviaries.
  • Absence of quarantines on new acquisitions.

 

TRANSMISSION:

  • Oral: Contact with contaminated material with feces and fluids.
  • Directly: Through Inlay hatchlings.

 

CLINIC:

  • Ruffling feathers.
  • Yellowed diarrhea
  • Undigested seeds in feces.
  • High mortality
  • Incoordination of movements
  • Stiff neck that prevents movement
  • Rotating head down

 

DIAGNOSIS:

Isolation and identification in the laboratory from stool samples from affected individuals.

TREATMENT:

  • Praziquantel (one dose / rest 2 weeks / dose one).
  • Ronidazole (Trichocure) (60-400 mg / lt. Water for 5-7 days).
  • Metronidazole (Flagyl) (40-100 mg./lt. Water for 5-7 days.
  • Carnidazol (Spartrix) (1 dose of 20-50 mg / kg body weight).
  • Vitamin B.

 

Parasitic Diseases Gouldian finch

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